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Sunday, May 13, 2012

Gluten Free Flax Meal Sandwich Bread


Gluten free, egg free, nut free, soy free
 
Flax Meal and Millet Sandwich Bread

This flax and millet bread is cheap, easy and takes all of 20 - 25 minutes from start to finish.  Oh, and it’s also super tasty.  It makes a great sandwich bread because it is soft and flexible, doesn’t crumble and isn’t dry or gummy.  Grinding your own flax meal and millet flour in a coffee grinder using flax seeds and millet is even cheaper than buying flax meal and millet flour (check here for more info on grinding your own flour), so if you grind your own flour this bread can be made for very cheap indeed.   

If you are ok with buying from the bulk section it’s even cheaper as flax seeds and millet can be had much cheaper in bulk bins than pre-packaged.  Be careful, though; people who are celiac or very gluten sensitive should be aware of the potential for cross- contamination from other glutinous bulk products.  Personally, I’m super gluten intolerant and have never had a problem with bulk bins, but there is a possibility of contamination so it’s up to you to decide if you want to take your chances. 
 

When I first discovered I was gluten intolerant, I used to make a flax bread that was wonderfully soft and yummy.  The problem was that it also required something like 5 eggs, which can get pricey, especially when you buy free range like I do.  So I stopped making it and moved on to other things.  However, a few weeks ago I was preparing to leave my Wisconsin home with hubby-to-be and spend the summer back home in Vancouver, BC.  I was trying to use up whatever was leftover in the apartment and I was low on flours to make my regular bread things, but had a bag of flax seeds, which I knew I could grind up to make my own flax meal.  So I searched around the internet for a gluten free, egg free flax bread recipe.  I found this one here for a flax pizza crust.  I adapted it to make use of whatever was in the cupboard and came up with this gluten free flax bread.  

Flax Meal Bread

It makes a great sandwich bread, but can also be eaten plain, or slathered with your favorite toast toppings.  I also like to spread Chocolate Raisin and Date Spread on it as a snack.

Ingredients:*

1 c + 1Tbsp ground flax (flax meal)
½ c millet flour (or about ¼ + 1Tbsp millet, ground)
1 tsp salt, plus a bit more for sprinkling
1 Tbsp baking powder
1 c water

Optional Seasonings
2 tsp oregano
½ Tbsp dried onion
1 tsp garlic powder
½ Tbsp rosemary
Shredded cheese (optional)

Directions:

1. Mix dry ingredients, optional seasonings and water together. 

2. Let rest for 5 minutes to thicken.  Don’t let it sit longer than this or else the dough will become too thick to spread. 

3. In the meantime, prepare a baking sheet by spraying it with oil, or laid with parchment paper and sprayed lightly with oil.

4. Preheat oven to 450F. 

5. Spread flax batter over the sheet, about ¼” thick, sprinkle with more salt, and bake about 10 minutes, until hardened but still slightly springy. 

What’s your favorite way to use flax meal and flax seeds?

* OAS Information: Some people with Oral Allergy Syndrome may have problems with some of the herbs used here (even though I suggest using dried, which *should* be safe).  You may want to substitute these with something you know you can safely eat. 

22 comments:

  1. How cool is that??? I'm going to give this a try! It is so difficult to find a good bread that has any taste when the eggs are eliminated. My daughter has an egg allergy as well, so I have to do a lot of searching. Thanks so much for sharing. It looks wonderful!

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    1. I definitely think it's tasty, with the herbs it ends up tasting almost like focaccia bread, and it's nice and spongy :)

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  2. Now you are my kind of girl! There are so many great blogs out there with divine recipes and amazing healthy ingredients...that I can't afford. :( This bread looks great! And easy! And nutritious...not a ton of empty starches! Do you think I could use oat flour in place of the millet? I do not have millet...and I want to make this now!

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    1. Lol, you're so cute! Yes, I think you could totally get away with using oat, or any other flour probably, in place of the millet. It's the flax that's needed to bind it together. I made this the other day using chickpea flour instead of millet and it turned out just fine.

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  3. Made this yesterday (finally!)! Makes a great sandwich bread and holds together great. Also yummy with df butter and homemade strawberry jam! Thanks for a great recipe!

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  4. Hi Kristy, glad you enjoyed the recipe! Thanks for stopping by and commenting :)

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  5. Does this rise at all? Do you just cut it into squares like bars?

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  6. Hi SheClicks,
    It's a flat bread so it doesn't rise a ton, but it does rise a bit in the oven. Since it's yeast free it won't really rise before baking, so once you spread it on the sheet just pop it in the oven. Once it's baked you can cut it any way you like! You can cut it into smaller pieces for dipping in things or cut it into larger squares like sandwich bread size.

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  7. Nice post! I'm so glad to get to visit this site. Thank you for sharing this interesting and informative post. I'll be looking forward for your other posts as well. Keep it up! Flaxseed is low in carbs, making it a good choice to have in bread when you want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. So the next time you want bread for a sandwich or toast, try our healthy flaxseed bread

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  8. This is amazing! I am GF and have OAS and that combo is SO difficult to change to as an adult. Thanks for your tips!!

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    1. So glad you like it :) I'm always happy to meet someone else with OAS, too!!

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  9. Sounds great! Just to clarify, you wrote "½ c millet flour (or about ¼ + 1Tbsp millet, ground)". Does that mean 1/4 *cup* + 1 Tbsp. millet, ground? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Rochelle, the ultimate goal is 1/2 cup of millet flour. If you grind about 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp of millet in a coffee grinder or other grinder you end up with about 1/2 cup millet flour as millet usually doubles in size when ground.

      So you can start with either 1/2 cup of store bought millet flour, or grind your own. I hope that makes more sense!

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  10. If I wanted the bread thicker would egg do that? I am a bread making amateur, but trying to save some money for my GF/DF wife.

    thanks for the recipe, I'll give it a shot.

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    1. Hi Mike, it depends on what you mean by thicker - if you mean like a regular loaf of bread, then no, this won't be like that. That usually requires a lot more flours in combination (i.e. rice flours, sorghum, tapioca starch and xanthan gum to bind the flours as a gluten replacement) and usually 2-3 eggs. This is just a basic, spongy flatbread.

      For this bread an egg or two would probably only make it a bit lighter and perhaps less dense.

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  11. I used soy flour in place of millet flour because I just could not find millet flour or millet any where except the aisle with bird treats in it (lol) and I added dried minced onions and a little turmeric and then topped it with a light dusting of Parmesan cheese. I really was not sure I would like this but I just cut it up for sandwiches and tried a small piece and it was absolutely delicious.

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    1. Thanks for your comment on your adjustments! Those sound like great additions and I'm so glad you liked it :)

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  12. Millet traditionally was seed for bird feed and in some cases it is still used for that purpose, however, it does make an excellent flour and I have made great pancakes with it.

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  13. I have to say Danielle, this is genius. Thank you so much for the recipe! I just made this with flaxmeal and buckwheat flour and indian spices, and it was addictive. I don't even think it needed the smear of dairy-free butter. The fact that it is so flexible means it won't fall apart in the toaster, and one can make a variety of sizes of sandwiches and snacks. Better still, my fiance' who eats a lot of wheat-based food, albeit organic, loves it and it's quick enough for him to want to make it. I would love for him to make this as one of his primary breads, so much healthier than store-bought! I can already see it working for soaked currents and cinammon as a "raisin" bread, and of course it is amazing as a savory bread.

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    1. Oh my gosh, ML, your variations sound amazing! I haven't made this one for awhile now (I've been experimenting with other flatbreads), but I'm definitely going to have to revisit this now ;)

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  14. Can I just say, I was really skeptical. I have had my share of kitchen blunders since (well, and before) gluten free.

    I just ate my first slice...This bread is GREAT!

    I did not hesitate to try it because as you mention..it is cheap, and I wanted so bad for this super economical and healthy bread to turn out. THANK YOU SO MUCH. In the first time in 8 months gluten free I have found a recipe I will make again and again.

    I will return to try the lentil sprouted bread;-)

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    1. Hi Sonja, thanks so much for your comment, and I'm so glad you liked the bread! It is still one of my easiest recipes, and I still like to take a slice or two of this when I'm traveling because it's so easy to make the night before :)

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