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Friday, May 2, 2014

Best Gluten Free Multiseed Multigrain Sandwich Bread (GF Breadmaker Bread)

Free of gluten, nuts, soy


My mom used to always make bread by hand. As a kid there was nothing better than waking up in the morning to the smell of fresh baked brown molasses bread, and slicing up a piece of still-warm bread and slathering it with homemade jam. Like me, mom tends to be a bit of an insomniac and while I get up and write in the middle of the night, my mom usually bakes! 

Although I learned to knead bread at a young age, when I had to go gluten free I thought I would have to give up the lovely thick slabs of bread I had gotten used to. 5 years ago a lot of GF breads were small, flat, gummy, or cardboard like. 

Then my mom kindly bought me a breadmaker! Personally I find that the best gluten free loaves of bread are those made in a breadmaker. Nowadays I don't often pull my breadmaker off the shelf. The reason for that is when I do, I end up gobbling up a whole bunch of this bread at once! It's definitely the very best GF bread I've ever made.


This recipe was adapted from one of the recipes that came with my breadmaker - this Black & Decker Convection Bread Maker that has a gluten free setting. I imagine that it could be made in most breadmakers on the gluten free setting, or by creating a special setting on your machine.

The difference with a GF setting is that there is only 1 rising, whereas most regular breads rise twice and take longer to make.


I have not tried making this bread without my breadmaker. What I can say is that it mixes for 13 minutes, rises for 14 minutes, then bakes for 52 minutes (I'm not sure what temp that is, though). 
 

The recipe was originally a pumpernickel bread recipe, but I've turned it into a multi grain and multi seed bread.

It makes a 1.5 lb loaf that makes about 15 thin slices. It's a really sturdy bread that serves well for sandwiches and toast. It's not crumbly or  dry or gummy. It's pretty much as close to mom's bread as I can get, with the addition of various different seeds.





Vegan opt? You might ask. Well I haven't tried making this vegan. It calls for 3 eggs and dry milk. The closest I've come to vegan is sub'ing one of the eggs with a flax egg (1 Tbsp ground flax mixed with 3 Tbsp warm water).

I wouldn't sub all 3 eggs with flax eggs, though, as I suspect that it might get gummy and wouldn't rise the same. It's possible that an egg replacer (like Ener-G Egg Replacer ) might work well.

As for the milk powder, I'm not sure it's even necessary...


Ingredients for Gluten Free Multi-seed Multi-grain Bread

1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup milk powder
1 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup millet flour
1/2 cup brown rice flour
1 cup tapioca starch
1 Tbsp cocoa powder
1 Tbsp xanthan gum
Mix of poppy seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and/or whole millet grains (up to 1/4 cup total)
4 1/2 tsp active dry yeast (I just use plain old Fleischmann's active dry yeast, nothing fancy like the quick rise or breadmaker yeast)

1 cup warm water
3 large eggs
3 Tbsp olive oil
1 tsp cider vinegar
3 Tbsp molasses


Directions


1. Sift together dry ingredients in a medium-sized bowl. 

2. Place the paddle inside the bread pan. Add in the wet ingredients. Then top with dry ingredients. Turn on machine to gluten free setting or custom setting. 

Once done, remove from the pan and cool. Slice as desired. This bread freezes wonderfully - slice the bread and freeze in a bag. Pull off slices as needed and defrost.

Tips:  

* To prevent any lumps or flour left along the side of the pan, use a spatula to work under the mix during the mixing setting, and along the sides. Watch out for the moving paddle!

* If the paddle is removable,, remove it as soon as the mixing cycle is complete to prevent a gaping hole inside the centre of the bread. 




Looking for more gluten free bread and baked goods recipes? Check out my Breads & Baked Goods Page! 

Gluten Free Bread & Baked Goods



Do you have a favorite bread recipe? Link it up in the comments if so! 




Have you checked out my gluten free pasta book  Recipes for Unusual Gluten Free Pasta: Pierogis, Dumplings, Desserts and More! ? Get yourself a copy and start making GF won tons, pierogis, dumplings, and orzo today :)  

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KOBSVDI/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00KOBSVDI&linkCode=as2&tag=pooandglufr03-20&linkId=XQEAIRXIVZUMBNGU

 

5 comments:

  1. Your bread looks delicious - the texture looks amazing from the photographs. Love the sound of the recipe too. Pinned :-) Thank you for sharing it with us at the Hearth and Soul hop.

    ReplyDelete
  2. how does one remove the paddles if this dough is a sticky cake batter like consistancy as most Gluten Free recipes are? Do you reach in with tongs and pull the paddles through the dough? What I usually do with a Breadmaker Gluten Free type bread is mix everything in a bowl with a regular mixer and then when the Breadmaker machine is finished it's mixing cycle (I don't have the paddles on), I pour the batter into the machine to finish with rising and baking. What kind of yeast exactly? Would your dry yeast be a rapid rise or quick rise, breadmaker yeast or active dry yeast? Buying yeast is very confusing at times when there's so many kinds out there. I want to try your recipe but want to make sure I'm using the same yeast, I've had many flops since going Gluten Free. Thanks :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there,

      Yes, getting the paddle out can be a bit messy and sticky - I usually use a spatula and a knife (although tongs are a great idea!) to scrap the dough around the paddle out of the way and work the paddle out, then smooth over the top of the dough.

      I use just plain Fleischmann's active dry yeast (not quick rise or bread maker or any specialty one, just plain old active dry yeast). Thanks for mentioning it, I've changed the recipe to be more specific!

      Delete
  3. If I omitted the milk powder, would I need to replace it with some other dry ingredient so the dough isn't too wet?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't say 100% since I haven't done it, but I don't think you'd need to replace it. It just dissolves into water and doesn't really take up a lot of moisture, so I suspect you could omit it without a problem. The milk powder was in the original recipe and I've just never done away with it, but if you try it, please let me know! And next time I make it I'll go without and see what happens and note it here.

      Delete

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